Chile’s next president

Boric’s generational change and the reconstruction of a long suffered country

Antonio E. Holanda

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Post-card with a drawing of a man lying down and soldier’s boots around him. It says in the title: “No more agression”
Piece in the MLIAC Collecion- No Más agression — by Francisco Moreno Capdevila. Photo by Antonio E. Holanda — Acervo Pessoal

As 2021 ended, Latin America saw one more step towards the political left, and that’s good news for the region

First Alberto Fernandes’ victory against Macri, the president running for re-election on a pro-business agenda. Although the rich world always advises middle-income nations against a more social agenda, Argentina’s economy has never improved much under neoliberal pro-business policies. The reason for it, if one can simplify a very complex scenario, is that, although in the middle-income spectrum as a country, Argentina’s population reason as a developed European country, much like Italy or Spain. That pushes them to fight any policy that produces restrains in the well-fare state.

Then, in 2020, Bolivia elected Luis Arce, former finance minister of Evo Morales. Bolivia’s situation is much more precarious. It is a much poorer country; it is landlocked. It has a deep inequality between popular segments and country regions. Until Arce’s election, Bolivia was facing both a political crisis and an outlaw government. In October 2019, Evo Morales, the president seeking a third term (his right to do so is legally debatable), was about to win the election when a power-glitch triggered fraud claims, rendering the election results invalid and producing a national crisis. Street protests against the rigged election in favor of Morales prompted out around the country. After weeks of protests, Morales fled the country, making room for a transitional government led by Jeanine Áñez, a deputy head of the senate self-declared interim president.

A paper “by the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) to verify the numerical and statistical results of the Bolivian election” said it couldn’t find “any statistical evidence of fraud” in the 2019 Bolivian election (WP). Nevertheless, in the 2020s election, Morales wasn’t on the ballot. His legacy and political sphere were represented by Arce, the architect of his economic plan, who ended up elected as president.

Now, in 2021, Chile elected Gabriel Boric, a 35yo former congressperson, defeating a candidate from the far-right. This is, in Chile’s historical moment, the second time its people strongly reject…

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Antonio E. Holanda

Brazilian living in France. Academia: Law and Literature.